Deputy Marshal John Perry United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service U.S. Government End of Watch: Tuesday, March 8, 2011

https://i1.wp.com/media.bnd.com/smedia/2011/03/09/17/John_Perry.embedded.prod_affiliate.98.jpgPatch image: United States Department of Justice - United States Marshals Service, U.S. Government

Deputy Marshal John Perry
United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service
U.S. Government

End of Watch: Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Biographical Info
Age: 48
Tour of Duty: 26 years
Badge Number: Not available

Incident Details
Cause of Death: Gunfire
Date of Incident: Tuesday, March 8, 2011
Incident Location: Missouri
Weapon Used: Gun; Unknown type
Suspect Info: Shot and killed

Deputy Marshal John Perry was shot and killed in St. Louis, Missouri, while serving a warrant.
At approximately 6:50 am Deputy Marshal Perry along with approximately ten other U.S. Marshals and St. Louis police officers went to the suspect’s home to serve a felony warrant for assault on a law enforcement officer and drug possession.
The officers were able to remove several children from the home before beginning their search for the suspect. As the officers searched the home for the suspect, he opened fire on them, striking one deputy marshal and one St. Louis police officer. In a second exchange of gunfire, a second deputy marshal was shot and the suspect was shot and killed.
Deputy Marshal Perry was transported to a local hospital where he succumbed to his wounds later in the day.
Deputy Marshal Perry had served with the United States Marshals Service for 10 years and had previously served 16 years as a probation officer for the Madison County Probation and Court Services Department.

Agency Contact Information
United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service
2604 Jefferson Davis Highway
Office of the Director
Alexandria, VA 22301
Phone: (304) 623-0486
Please contact the United States Department of Justice – United States Marshals Service for funeral arrangements or for survivor benefit fund information.

www.bnd.com

The U.S. marshal shot and killed in St. Louis Tuesday was a longtime probation officer for Madison County, remembered as "an officer and a gentleman."

Deputy U.S. Marshal John Perry, 48, of Collinsville died Tuesday evening at St. Louis University Hospital after he and two other officers were shot by a man they were trying to arrest earlier that day.

Perry was shot in the head while attempting to arrest Carlos Boles, who was wanted on charges of assaulting a police officer and drug possession. Boles allegedly opened fire on the team attempting to arrest him and was killed by police returning fire.

Perry had served with the U.S. Marshal Service for nearly 10 years. But before that, he served 16 years as a Madison County probation officer.

Supervisor Judy Dallas said her entire department was "devastated and grief-stricken" when they heard about Perry’s shooting Tuesday, keeping a vigil all day as they waited for updates.

"John was one of the really good guys … one of those humorous and upbeat people that was a pleasure to be around," Dallas said. "We referred to John as a true officer and a gentleman in every sense of the word."

Most of Perry’s time in Madison County was spent in adult probation, with a small stint in juvenile. He excelled on the "intensive probation unit," Dallas said — the armed probation officers who are given the highest-risk offenders, violent felons and those deemed most likely to reoffend.

Nonetheless, Perry had a good success rate with his clients, Dallas said. "John had this very calming demeanor — he was a very mellow person," Dallas said. "He was able to develop such rapport with his clients."

Dallas’ voice became choked up as she described a "somber and tearful" day in the probation department. "He’s part of our family," she said.

Details about Perry’s family and a memorial service were not immediately available.

Also wounded Tuesday were Deputy U.S. Marshal Theodore Abegg and an unnamed St. Louis city police officer. Abegg was hit in the ankle, and the city officer was grazed on the face and neck from a shot deflected by his vest.

"Our people and our partners are well-trained and prepared, but it is impossible to predict when a wanted individual will make a fateful choice that results in the loss of life or injury," said Stacia A. Hylton, director of the Marshal Service. "When that happens, and the life lost is a law enforcement officer or other public servant, it is an immeasurable tragedy felt by all."

William Sibert, the U.S. Marshal in St. Louis, was joined Tuesday morning at the hospital by city Police Chief Dan Isom and Mayor Francis Slay. "This is a tragic example of what our law enforcement officers go through every day," Slay said. "They need our support and their families need our support."

Perry’s death was the second time in less than a month that a U.S. deputy marshal was shot and killed — but only the third since the Ruby Ridge incident in 1992. The incident will be studied by a review board as is protocol for officer-involved shootings, according to Jeff Carter, a spokesman for the marshals service in Washington, D.C.

Carter said marshals are generally outfitted in tactical gear with body armor, but typically don’t wear helmets. He did not know whether Perry was using a shield when the team went in to arrest Boles.

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